Welcome!

Welcome to the official site for the Delaware State Osteopathic Medical Society (DSOMS). The DSOMS is a non-profit professional organization comprised of osteopathic physicians, residents, interns, and medical students who meet the membership requirements of the DSOMS Constitution and Bylaws. We are affiliated with the American Osteopathic Association (AOA).

News, Business & CME Meetings

Spring CME Meeting; Help Vaccinate your Patients for HPV

The DSOMS Spring CME Conference was held on May 10, 2018.     The conference topics were on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine.  Here were the topics for the CME program:

5:00pm  James Ziccardi, DO – Exercise: the Road to Recovery

6:00pm  William Emanuele, DO – Concussion Management

7:00pm  Bernard King, DO – Performance Enhancing Steroids

8:00pm  Victor Kalman, DO – Physical Examination of the Hip: Indications for Hip Arthroscopy

9:00pm  Nicholas Biasotto, DO – Legislative Update: Gun Control

 

=======================================================================

As part of a contract Quality Insights of Delaware has with the State, QID is working to increase the use of HPV vaccine for appropriate candidates. 

If you are interested, QID can work with your practice to bring resources and create awareness, and hopefully immunization of appropriate patients.

The goal is to have practices enrolled and promoting HPV vaccine before the end of June.   If you are interested, let either Dr Sobel (esobel@qualityinsights.org) or Lisa Gruss (lgruss@qualityinsights.org) who heads this up for QID know, and we will get the ball rolling for your practice.

======================================================================

The most reccent meeting of the DSOMS was on March 14 at the University and Whist Club.

The speaker was Julieanna Sees, DO who presented a presentation on "Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy."

The meeting was sponsored by St. Francis Healthcare; the DSOMS thanks SFH for their continuing support. 

======================================================================

Our previous membership meeting and CME program was November 7, 2017.   

Our  CME presentations were:

“Clearing Confusion about Breast Density”

presented by Robin Ciocca, DO, Surgical Oncologist/General Surgeon

and

 “Treating Irritable Bowel” presented by Nicole Albert, DO, Gastroenterologist.  

Their presentations were sponsored by Main Line Health System. 

The DSOMS thanks Main Line Health System for its continuing support of the Society.

 

  

 

A Look Back

Dr. Andrew Taylor Still is credited with starting the Osteopathic medical profession when he founded the American School of Osteopathy (now A.T. Still University) in Kirksville, Missouri in 1892.

Dr. Still was born in Virginia in 1828, the son of a Methodist minister and physician. At an early age he decided to follow in his father's footsteps and become a physician. After studying medicine and serving an apprenticeship under his father, he became a licensed MD in the state of Missouri. In the early 1860s, he completed additional coursework at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Kansas City, MO and went on to serve as a surgeon in the Union Army during the Civil War.

After the Civil War and following the death of three of his children from spinal meningitis in 1864, Dr. Still concluded that the orthodox medical practices of his day were frequently ineffective, and sometimes harmful. He devoted the next ten years of his life to studying the human body and finding better ways to treat disease.

His research and clinical observations led him to believe that the musculoskeletal system played a vital role in health and disease. He concluded that the body contained all of the elements needed to maintain health, if properly stimulated. Dr. Still believed that by correcting problems in the body's structure, through the use of manual techniques now known as osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), the body's ability to function and to heal itself could be greatly improved. He also promoted the idea of preventive medicine and endorsed the philosophy that physicians should focus on treating the whole patient, rather than just the disease. 

Learn more about Osteopathic Medicine by clicking on the Osteopathic Medicine tab on this page.

Your next Zumba class can leave you feeling more than invigorated. It can help alleviate your stress and improve your mental, physical and emotional quality of life.

Osteopathic researchers found working out in a group lowers stress by 26 percent and significantly improves quality of life, while those who exercise individually put in more effort but experienced no significant changes in their stress level and a limited improvement to quality of life, according to a study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

“The communal benefits of coming together with friends and colleagues, and doing something difficult, while encouraging one another, pays dividends beyond exercising alone,” said Dayna Yorks, DO, lead researcher on this study. “The findings support the concept of a mental, physical and emotional approach to health.”

Dr. Yorks and her fellow researchers at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine recruited 69 medical students—a group known for high levels of stress and self-reported low quality of life—and allowed them to self-select into a twelve-week exercise program, either within a group setting or as individuals. A control group abstained from exercise other than walking or biking as a means of transportation.

“Having an outlet to help manage stress and feel better mentally and physically can potentially improve one’s quality of life.”

Every four weeks, participants completed a survey asking them to rate their levels of perceived stress and quality of life in three categories: mental, physical and emotional.

Those participating in group exercise spent 30 minutes at least once a week in CXWORX, a core strengthening and functional fitness training program. At the end of the twelve weeks, their mean monthly survey scores showed significant improvements in all three quality of life measures: mental (12.6 percent), physical (24.8 percent) and emotional (26 percent). They also reported a 26.2 percent reduction in perceived stress levels.

By comparison, individual fitness participants were allowed to maintain any exercise regimen they preferred, which could include activities like running and weight lifting, but they had to work out alone or with no more than two partners. On average the solitary exercisers worked out twice as long, and saw no significant changes in any measure, except in mental quality of life (11 percent increase). Similarly, the control group saw no significant changes in quality of life or perceived stress.

“Given this data on the positive impact group fitness can have, we should all consider group fitness opportunities,” said Dr. Yorks. “Having an outlet to help manage stress and feel better mentally and physically can potentially improve one’s quality of life.”

Points of Contact

Delaware State
Osteopathic Medical Society
P.O. Box 2693
Wilmington, DE 19805
Phone: 302.543.4767
Email: dsomsoc@gmail.com

**The DO Difference** (scroll down after clicking headline)

Contact Us

Got a question?  Looking for more information on an upcoming event?  Need to pay your dues?  Contact us, we'll be glad to assist you.

CME ONLINE

CME ONLINE gives you access to AOA-generated online programs, including publications, Web programs and qualified CME activities. Click here to learn more.

Stay Up-to-Date

Visit The DO for news and features about the osteopathic medical profession. Click here for the latest installment.

JSN Epic template designed by JoomlaShine.com